cockle

cockle
dirvinė raugė statusas T sritis vardynas apibrėžtis Gvazdikinių šeimos vaistinis nuodingas augalas (Agrostemma githago), paplitęs Europoje ir šiaurės Afrikoje. atitikmenys: lot. Agrostemma githago angl. cockle; common corn cockle; corn cockle; corn rose; corn-campion; corn-pink; purple cockle vok. Feld-Rade; Korn-Rade rus. куколь обыкновенный; куколь посевной lenk. kąkol polny; kąkolnica zbożowa šaltinis Dekoratyvinių augalų vardynas: lietuvių, lotynų, anglų, vokiečių, lenkų ir rusų kalbomis / Dalia Kisielienė, Ieva Grigienė, Algirdas Grigas. – Vilnius: Mokslo ir enciklopedijų leidybos institutas, 2007; Valstybinės lietuvių kalbos komisijos 2003 m. rugsėjo 12 d. rekomendacija Nr. 3 „Dėl riešutų ir juos vedančių augalų lietuviškų pavadinimų“ (Inf. pran., 2003, Nr. 70); Valstybinės lietuvių kalbos komisijos 2008 m. birželio 25 d. protokolinis nutarimas Nr. PN-5 „Dėl rekomendacijos „Dėl medieninių, pluoštinių, dervinių, rauginių ir kitų techninėms reikmėms naudojamų augalų lietuviškų pavadinimų“ (Inf. pran., 2008, Nr. 47-655); Valstybinės lietuvių kalbos komisijos 2012 m. gruodžio 20 d. protokolinis nutarimas Nr. PN-5 „Dėl rekomendacijos „Dėl dekoratyvinių augalų lietuviškų pavadinimų (A–B)“

Lithuanian dictionary (lietuvių žodynas). 2015.

Игры ⚽ Поможем написать реферат
Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Cockle — Coc kle (k[o^]k k l), n. [OE. cockes cockles, AS. s[=ae]coccas sea cockles, prob, from Celtic; cf. W. cocs cockles, Gael. cochull husk. Perh. influenced by F. coquille shell, a dim. from the root of E. conch. Cf. {Coach}.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) A bivalve …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cockle — cockle1 [käk′əl] n. [ME cokel < OFr coquille, a blister, shell, cockle, altered (infl. by coq, COCK1) < L conchylium < Gr konchylion, shellfish < konchē: see CONCH] 1. any of a family (Cardiidae) of edible, marine bivalve mollusks… …   English World dictionary

  • Cockle — Coc kle, n. [AS. coccel, cocel; cf. Gael. cogall tares, husks, cockle.] (Bot.) (a) A plant or weed that grows among grain; the corn rose ({Luchnis Githage}). (b) The {Lotium}, or darnel. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cockle — may refer to: Cockle (bivalve), a group of edible saltwater clams (marine molluscs) Lolium temulentum, a tufted grass plant Berwick cockles, a confectionery from Scotland Cockleshell The Mark II canoes used in Operation Frankton in 1942 The… …   Wikipedia

  • Cockle — Coc kle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cockled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Cockling}.] [Of uncertian origin.] To cause to contract into wrinkles or ridges, as some kinds of cloth after a wetting. [1913 Webster] {Cockling sea}, waves dashing against each other with …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cockle — ► NOUN 1) an edible burrowing bivalve mollusc with a strong ribbed shell. 2) (also cockleshell) literary a small shallow boat. ● warm the cockles of one s heart Cf. ↑warm the cockles of one s heart DERIVATIVES …   English terms dictionary

  • cockle — cockle1 /kok euhl/, n., v., cockled, cockling. n. 1. any bivalve mollusk of the genus Cardium, having somewhat heart shaped, radially ribbed valves, esp. C. edule, the common edible species of Europe. 2. any of various allied or similar mollusks …   Universalium

  • cockle — [14] The cockle is related etymologically to another mollusc, the conch: they both began life in Greek kónkhē – which meant ‘mussel’ as well as ‘conch’. From this was formed the diminutive konkhúlion ‘small variety of conch’ – hence ‘cockle’. The …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • cockle — [14] The cockle is related etymologically to another mollusc, the conch: they both began life in Greek kónkhē – which meant ‘mussel’ as well as ‘conch’. From this was formed the diminutive konkhúlion ‘small variety of conch’ – hence ‘cockle’. The …   Word origins

  • Cockle — This name has two possible derivations, the first from the early Medieval English or Olde French cokille which means a shell or cockle . This surname may have been applied to pilgrims to the Shrine of St. James of Compostella who sewed shells on… …   Surnames reference

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”